Jun 14 2013
Happy Father's Day from Eric!

Growing up I was never super close to my dad. Not that he was a bad dad or a bad guy. We are just different people – from a faith standpoint and from a personality standpoint. Not bad– just different. I don't hold any grudges, but I can tell my dad often feels bad about it. He'll say things like - "you are so much more involved in your kids' lives than I ever was." Looking back, I can see my dad always loved me.

I remember I went through this phase in high school where I didn't want my dad to come to my soccer games. I'm not sure why? I probably figured he didn't want to be there. I'll never forget one game in particular when I scored a goal to help our team win. It was an exhilarating feeling, but tempered when I looked into the stands and saw no familiar faces. Even though I said I didn't want my dad there, inside I really did.

After the game, I met my dad in the parking lot and got in the car. I excitedly told him what happened in the game and he smiled and replied, "I know…I saw it." He sat and watched the game from his car in the parking lot, so I didn't know he was there. Even when I said I didn't want him there, he was there for me. Maybe he wanted to be there for himself…or maybe he intuitively knew I needed him there.

-Eric

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Mar 22 2013
Kristian Stanfill Interview

Kristian Stanfill joined us in the studio and chatted about his song "One Thing Remains," among other topics.





Listen to the interview below or Thursday's full Eric and Mandy podcast. You can also subscribe to the daily podcast on iTunes or through Feedburner.

The story behind "One Thing Remains" and beating Chris Tomlin on the Air1 Top Ten:

On country music and how country boys wear leather:

The "March Madness" song:

Full interview, with bonus unaired material from Kristian Stanfill, on today's podcast:

 

 

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Mar 08 2013
The Power of Five Dollars

 

A couple of Sundays ago I was given $5 from my church. That's right, my church gave me money. In fact, everyone in church that morning was given some cash - anywhere from $5 to $100. My church just has wads of cash and it doesn't know what to do with it! Kidding!

Your church may have done this in the past, too. The idea was that we were to use this money with "maximum impact" for someone else. It was also a reminder that EVERYTHING we have (money, home, things, jobs, kids, etc.) belongs to God - we are just stewards of these things.

So what can you really do with $5 that can make an impact on someone else? I got great suggestions - buying water for the homeless, getting a cup of coffee for a stranger at Starbucks, buying lunch for the person behind me in the drive-thru (lots of food-related stuff).

I held that bill in my wallet, because I kept waiting for this amazing moment where I would rescue some stranger with my 5 bucks! I pictured myself at a gas station and overhearing some person saying, "I only need 1 1/4 worth of gas to get my grandma to the hospital, but I have no money?!" And then I run to them (in slow motion) with my $5 and save the day. There is crying and hugging and the ensuing Lifetime movie based on this experience.

Everything I thought of or that was suggested involved a stranger. Not a bad thing, mind you. But as sat and prayed about it, my Dad came to mind. I'm not super close to my dad. There is no animosity - we are just very different people. We don't hang out or talk much outside of family get-togethers. My dad doesn't need $5. In fact, my dad has helped me a zillion times with money throughout my entire life. Always helpful; always generous. The last few years his health has declined and he's struggled with trying to sell his business. My dad has worked so hard and long for many years, but now at this stage of his life the business was just weighing him down.

About a week ago we found out he had a buyer for his business. My dad would soon be able to retire. I could give him the 5 bucks - he wasn't going to be working after all. Nah, I thought I would do something that I don't recall ever doing and out of character for our relationship. I would send him a card that costs me $5.

In that card I was able to tell my dad "congratulations." I was able to tell him "great job on a lifetime of hard work" and how that hard work was so appreciated. And how it allowed him to have to such an impact on my life and my family. There was a bit more to the card, but I'll keep that between the two of us.

I wanted to talk myself out of buying that card. Giving that money to a complete stranger would have been so much easier. Kind of like it's easier to go oversees to do mission work (which is awesome, by the way), than it is to talk to your neighbor...or to reach out to your own dad. There's more of a risk relationally and emotionally when its someone you know and love. And yet when it comes to using that money for maximum impact, I couldn't think of anyone better than a person who made such a maximum impact on my life.

-Eric

 

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Feb 22 2013
Dan's Story

If you’ve ever felt limited to a label that someone else has given you, Dan Dillard from the Air1 Morning Show can relate. He says that’s been a big part of his journey. Here’s his story.

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Dec 19 2012
'Tis the Season ... to Say 'Tis the Season

 

It must be a subconscious reflex this time of year, but the other day I found myself beginning a sentence by saying, “‘Tis the season …” As I was saying that, it hit me that ‘Tis the season to say, “‘Tis the season.”

I mean, I never found myself in July saying, “‘Tis the season for fireworks”.  Or in February saying, “‘Tis the season for  groundhogs to see their shadows.”

I’m not sure, but I think “‘Tis” is just a fancy way of saying “It’s”, right?  You might want to try throwing in a ‘Tis every once in a while to impress someone.  Add “season” in there, too, instead of saying “time.”  Something like …

‘Tis the season to eat some curly fries.  Or ‘Tis the season for a colonoscopy (which by the way, would make the world’s worst Christmas carol).

It got me thinking of how there are a number of things we say around Christmas that we rarely, if ever, say other times of the year …

Holly Jolly – as in, “have a holly jolly Christmas”.  Every once in a while, you may hear a fat, happy guy described as ‘jolly” outside of Christmas, but not too often – unless you are talking about Santa.  It’s like they came up with a nice way of telling Santa he’s chubby.  So I’m not really sure what “holly jolly” could mean, but I know it’s positive otherwise we wouldn’t wish someone to have a “holly jolly” Christmas.  After a football game, I’d love to hear a burly linebacker (a jolly linebacker, if you will) say, “That was holly jolly sack of the quarterback!”

Merry – Other than the phrase, “eat, drink and be merry”, we only say “merry” at Christmas time.  We don’t say “Merry Birthday” or “Merry New Year” or even “Merry Holidays”.  Everything else is “happy” – only Christmas is merry, apparently.

Hustle and Bustle – Other times of the year we are busy or life is hectic.  At Christmas time there is “hustle and bustle”.  I mean, it does make things sound so much more charming and festive to say, “hustle and bustle”, right?  Try this sentence for instance …

Remember to help the poor during the “hustle and bustle” of the holiday!

Or …

Remember – to help the poor during the insane free-for-all of maniacs fighting over parking spaces at the mall and leg wrestling a lady at Toys ‘R Us over a Barbie.

Hustle and bustle, right?  Not only does it economize words, but it also romanticizes your psychotic tendencies this time of year.  That’s a win-win.

So why does Christmas almost have its own language?  I blame Christmas carols – which is really a topic for another day.

In the meantime, in the midst of the hustle and bustle of the season have yourself a merry, little, holly jolly Christmas … ’tis the season, ya know.

 

 

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Aug 30 2012
My New Hero: Neil Armstrong

In a world where people are famous for being famous - like TV reality stars, Neil Armstrong never exploited his fame.  In fact, he went out of his way to avoid the spotlight. Air1 Morning Show news guy Dan Dillard takes a different look at the first man to walk on the moon in the latest "Dan Report" podcast. 

Click here to listen

 

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Aug 24 2012
A Bad Hair Day

We've all experienced the "bad haircut". Some of us may have received one of those bad haircuts from our siblings.  A dad who decided to get to the bottom of why his one daughter, 5, gave her younger sister, 3, what they called "the worst haircut ever."

Click here to read the whole story and hear the "interview with the daughters.

 

 

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Aug 15 2012
The Dan Report - "Why Do You Have to be So Mean?"

Are people getting meaner?  Or has social media now just given us a voice to express those "mean" thoughts that we used to just keep bottled in our head?  In the latest "Dan Report", Air1 Morning Show news guy Dan Dillard explores when and why people on the Internet got so mean?  

Click here to listen to Dan's discussion on this topic

And make sure you join Dan along with Eric & Mandy on the Air1 Morning Show on Air1.

Oh ... and feel free to comment on this story.  Just don't be mean ... unless that's your thing.

 

 

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Aug 06 2012
Welcome to the Eric & Mandy Blog

Hey ...

Welcome to the Eric & Mandy Blog.  

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